WaughFamilyTree.ca
By Jeff and Glenda Waugh
First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]
James William "Daisy" Waugh

James William "Daisy" Waugh

Male 1912 - 1936  (24 years)

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name James William "Daisy" Waugh 
    Born 1912  Nanaimo ,BC, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 31 Dec 1936  Nanaimo, B.C., Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I97  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2017 

    Father unknown 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Sarah Malcolm Waugh,   b. 27 Oct 1885, Kirknewton, Edinburghshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Jun 1957, Nanaimo, BC, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F48  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Ethel Elaine Storey,   b. 3 Aug 1917, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1996, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 12 Jul 1935  Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. James S. Waugh,   b. 10 Feb 1936, Nanaimo, BC, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jun 2002, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2017 
    Family ID F182  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1912 - Nanaimo ,BC, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 12 Jul 1935 - Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 31 Dec 1936 - Nanaimo, B.C., Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Daisy Waugh Death
    Daisy Waugh Death
    Daisy Waugh was a well known soccer player in Nanaimo, BC. He is buried at the Nanaimo Municipal Cemetery. He died at the age of 24 by electrocution in a mining accident. At the time of his death he was the highest pro soccer goal scorer in British Columbia. He was the youngest player to play in the provincial national championship. Residence at time of death: Milton Street, Nanaimo, BC. His death was reported both locally and nationally.

  • Notes 
    • Marriage certificate: film # 2135988. Registration # 1935-09-426499. James William “Daisy” Waugh listed his grandfather, William Waugh, as his father on his marriage certificate. He correctly named his mother as Sarah Waugh. James was born out of wedlock to an unnamed father and Sarah Waugh.

      He is buried at the Nanaimo Municipal Cemetery (Bowen Cemetery, Comox Road, range 052, plot 176. He is buried with his mother. The cemetery records incorrectly name him James MCLEAN Waugh, rather than James William Waugh. The headstone is correct). He died at the age of 24 by electrocution in a mining accident. Residence at time of death: Milton Street, Nanaimo, BC. His death was reported both locally and nationally.

      Daisy Waugh was a well known soccer player in Nanaimo, BC. At the time of his death he was the highest pro soccer goal scorer in British Columbia. He was the youngest player to play in the provincial national championship.
      ****************************************************************************************************************
      The following account of his death is from the 1936 Annual Report of the Minister of Mines - Province of British Columbia, page G11:

      The fatal accident which occurred to James Waugh, driver, No.1 mine, Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, at 10:30 p.m. on December 31st, 1936, was due to electrocution. Deceased was at work in the Protection area and all the men in this area reach and leave their work by means of Protection shaft; on this day Waugh and another driver had finished their work about 10 p.m. and instead of waiting to ascend Protection shaft with the other men of the shift they decided to walk out to No.1 shaft by way of No.1 level; this level is equipped for overhead electric trolley haulage, the voltage being 250, and about half-way to No.1 shaft Waugh made contact with the trolley-wire and sustained a shock from which he did not recover consciousness.

      ****************************************************************************************************************
      Excerpt from Boss Whistle: Vancouver Island Miners Remember by Lynne Bowen:

      Everyone who worked in Number One or Protection in the 1930's knew James "Daisy" Waugh. They knew him for his prowess on the soccer field and for his sunny nickname derived from the days when he brought his mother the fresh white and yellow flowers from the daisy field back of Robins Park. He loved parties, and there was no better night for parties in Nanaimo than New Year's Eve. On that night there were dances everywhere, and there was first footing, the good-luck custom practiced by Scots that required a dark-haired man to be the first over the threshold after midnight to bring in the new year.

      Daisy and his young wife Ethel were planning to dance at the Pygmy Ballroom* on its marvelous sprung floor before midnight and then join their fellow Scots on the rounds of their neighbours. But Daisy had to work the evening shift in Protection mine. He debated whether to skip work, but decided he was lucky to have a job, and had better not risk losing it, especially with a ten-month-old son to support.

      As Ethel laid out his dancing clothes for later, Daisy debated whether he would wear rubber boots or hobnails for work. Rubber boots made sense when the floor of the mine was wet, but hobnails were more comfortable. Twice he put on the rubber boots only to take them off and finally he chose the hobnails. With a promise to meet Ethel at the Pygmy in time to go first footing, he went to work the afternoon shift in the Cobble Hill section of Number One mine.

      There was going to be a great time in Nanaimo that night and some of the boys were rushin' out to get to the dance a little early before shift change. You could see their lights going by as they went along the main motor level. So we decided to pack up and go too. We could see this light wavin' ahead of us and all of a sudden - whoof. I says, "We'd better go and have a look." It was poor Daisy and he was dead. God knows what happened. The only thing we could see was a burn mark on his temple.

      Daisy had been walking along the main motor level with a friend when he noticed some machinery that intrigued him sitting on a siding. As he stood on the rail to get a better look, his head touched a copper trolley wire and he died instantly of electric shock. Had he been wearing his rubber boots, he would have been all right.

      When the news reached Nanaimo, orchestras fell silent in one dance hall after another. Grieving family and friends trudged home through the heavy snow that had fallen that night. Four days later, players from the city football team carried their teammate to the cemetery.

      * Note by Glenda Waugh: The Pygmy Ballroom was one of the five dance halls in Nanaimo. It was a popular Nanaimo jazz mecca in the 1930s and 40s and Louis Armstrong and Harry James both performed there. The site later became the Fiesta Bowling Alley, 99 Chapel Street, Nanaimo.